REFRIGERATION — PRINCIPLES OF MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION

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REFRIGERATION — PRINCIPLES OF MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION – Department of Defense 1964-01-01 – DOD PIN 27633 – SHOWS APPLICATION OF BASIC PHYSICS OF HEAT TRANSFER IN REFRIGERATION UNITS. EXPLAINS TEMPERATURE CHANGES IN REFRIGERANT PASSING THROUGH THE EXPANSION VALVE, COMPRESSOR, CONDENSER AND EVAPORATOR AS IT CARRIES HEAT TO THE OUTSIDE AIR.

Comments

Sai Kiran says:

Very very Nice

CoolRanch says:

US Air Force is a better teacher than my actual school

Manuel Calderon says:

Amazing video.

STUDIOS NOW says:

Big thanks.

james tomlin says:

Amazing video 😍

Tanmay Shah says:

Thank you for delivering this valuable knowledge so easily that I understood it which I was unable to do so by reading books from past few weeks

Joshitha Dyaan says:

Thanks for clearing concepts where will i find more videos like this?

ZachLuscher says:

Why must it have a phase change to work effectively? Why not just be a gas or liquid through the entire system? How does the compressor regulate the pressure so that it is at a certain temperature in the evaporator coil?
How do you keep the compressor from becoming a bomb when it pumps the high pressure gas into the resovior?

Pranoy koul says:

GOOD STUFF !!

Nexfero says:

physics and chemistry all over again

PV = nRT

krnman1 says:

Why is it necessary to compress the gas even hotter when going to the condenser?

Brentacus_300 says:

is there a reason for the 3 min 03 sec of black screen?

Sri Arya says:

As the name tells it is the Basic & Easy way to understand the principles of refrigeration. Thanks for such a educational video

Relaxify Music says:

Ahh… I was so happy to have reviewed the principles of boiling points in different substances… I was under the impression that all liquids boil at the same temperature that water boils. This of course led me to be even more confused when watching other similar videos that talked about the difference between sensible heat and latent heat. Thermodynamics used to be a nightmare for my understanding, but the more I learn about it and try to understand it, the more interesting it becomes.

james armlin says:

Great information, reminds me of school many moons ago!

Feathering Walthamstone says:

I love old military training videos. When you need to train tens of thousands of people per year in any given profession you need straight forward simple concepts that will work for the vast majority of them.

Jackson Young says:

Okay, I think I understand this.
The refrigerant R-12 boils at -21.

So Receiver sends liquid to expansion valve.
The expansion valve then starts boiling b/c of the decrease in pressure (colder) here then turns into gas.
The Compressor takes in the gas.
Compressor increases the pressure which would turn gas into liquid b/c an increase in temperature for R-12 makes it liquid.

Psycho9263 says:

The expansion valve is also called a metering device that operates from a sensing bulb charged with refrigerant R-12 or 22. This type of expansion valve is called a "Thermostatic Expansion Valve" or THV or TEV. When the sensing bulb detects a certain amount of superheat, the valve then "throttles" in a certain amount of refrigerant into the evaporator to avoid flooding it also prevents liquid refrigerant from leaving the evaporator if there is excessive superheat. Another type of system is called a "capillary system" which meters a uniform amount of refrigerant into the evaporator at a constant rate also called a "fixed bore" metering device. An evaporator fan is needed to draw the cold away from the evaporator to avoid icing and likewise a condenser fan to draw away the heat to avoid high-head pressure in the compressor.

John Williams says:

what drives the refrigerant through the lines?

john ceni says:

very educational

Christopher Stewart says:

I wonder what Kathy and Helen were gossiping about.

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